Go to the Home Page of Historical Folk Toys Catalog Continuation Page See Our Best Sellers

.

Catalog Navigation Legend

.
Page One
Traditional Melodies Book in C
Children's Songs to Sing & Play
May Carols in C
.
.
.
.
.
.

.

 

.
Page Two
One-Octave Melodies Book in C
Five-Note Melodies Book in D
Spinning and Weaving Songs
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

 

.
Other Sections
Early Education
Classic Toys & Puzzles
Traditional Games
Home Crafts
Historical Doll Kits
Folk Instruments
Native American
Historical Books
Index of Catalog Listings
.

Five-Note Melodies Book in D

.

Continued from product description on Music Books' Page Two...

Historical Background: These easy-to-play songs are all written in the key of D, especially for the pennywhistle, but can also be played on other instruments like a recorder, flute, violin, or a piano. This wide variety of melodies covers many kinds of music so there should be something for everyone in this book. From the nursery rhymes and folk songs to the Renaissance tunes, these are musical pieces that will either be familiar or become endearing.

All Through the Night is a Welch folk song that was first printed in 1784 with a different set of words than those normally sung. Harold Boulton, an English lyricist, wrote the lovely words below which have made this song so popular.

Sleep my love and peace attend thee,
All through the night.
Guardian angels God will lend thee,
All through the night.
Soft the drowsy hours are creeping,
Hill and dale in slumber steeping.
Love alone his watch is keeping,
All through the night.

Though I roam a minstrel lonely,
All through the night.
My true harp shall praise thee only,
All through the night.
Love's young dream alas is over,
Yet my strains of love shall hover
Near the presence of my lover
All through the night.

Hark! A solemn bell is ringing,
Clear through the night.
Thou, my love are heav'nward winging,
Home through the night.
Earthly dust from off thee shaken,
Soul immortal thou shalt waken
With thy last dim journey taken,
Home through the night.

"Sea chanties" (or "shanties") are songs of the sea sung by the shantyman (or chantyman) and were used during the era of tall sailing ships in the mid-19th century. The word "chanty" is probably derived from the French word "chanter" (to sing). As these hardworking square-riggers labored, they sang rhythmic songs to provide a steady rhythm to work in cadence. There were different kinds of chanties, depending on the work: Capstan shanties for raising the anchor, Halyard shanties for raising and lowering the sails, Short Drag shanties for difficult tasks like trimming sails or raising the masthead, Short Haul shanties for lighter tasks like setting the sails, Bunt shanties for furling the square sails, Windlass and Pumping shanties for pumping bilge water, and Ceremonial shanties for when a sailor paid off his debt to the ship.

Cape Cod Girls is a humorous sea chanty describing what can be done with the different parts of a codfish. It is ditty song that is sung while raising anchors and pumping water out of ships. It is thought to have been written by a Yankee sailor on route to Australia.

Cape Cod Girls they have no combs,
Heave away! Heave away!
They comb their hair with codfish bones,
We are bound for California.

Chorus:

Heave away, my bully, bully boys,
Heave away! Heave away!
Heave away and don't you make a noise,
We are bound for California!

Cape Cod boys they have no sleds,
Heave away! Heave away!
They slide down dunes on codfish heads.
We are bound for California.

Cape Cod doctors they have no pills,
Heave away! Heave away!
They give their patients codfish gills.
We are bound for California.

Cape Cod cats they have no tails,
Heave away! Heave away!
They lost them all in sou'east gales.
We are bound for California.

Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes was first published in America in 1789 but the lyrics are from the 3rd-century Greek poet, Philostratus the Athenian, whose words were translated from his "Letters" by Ben Johnson, England's great dramatist. The music has been credited to either Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart or a Colonel Mellish, but exactly who is not certain. What is certain is that this song has been sung since the birth of the United States.

Drink to me only with thine eyes,
And I will pledge with mine
Or leave a kiss within the cup
And I'll not ask for wine.
The thirst that from the soul doth rise
Doth ask a drink divine
But might I of Jove's nectar sip
I would not change for thine.

I sent the late a rosy wreath
Not so much hon'ring thee
As giving it a hope that there
It could not withered be
But thou there-on did'st only breathe
And sent'st it back to me
Since when it grows and smell, I swear
Not of itself but thee.

Eensy, Weensy Spider is a children's song for finger play.

The Eensy, Weensy spider went up the water spout.
Down came the rain and washed the spinder out.
Out came the sun and dried up all the rain
And the Eensy, Weensy spider went up the spout again.

The origin of the tune used with Go Tell Aunt Rhody is from a 1750 opera by Jean Jacques Rousseau titled "Le Devin du Village." The tune became known as Rousseau's Dream, an Air with Variations for the Piano Forte" and was published in 1881 by J.D. Cramer in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The words to Go Tell Aunt Rhody were first published in a Black Americana book, "Play Songs of the Deep South" by Altona Trent-Johns with illustrations by James Porter in 1944 by Associated Publishers. The 15 songs in dialect included in this book feature directions for dancing the folk dances that go with a particular song.

Go tell Aunt Rhody, go tell Aunt Rhody.
Go tell Aunt Rhody the old gray goose is dead.

The one she's been saving, the one she's been saving,
The one she's been saving to make a feather bed.

She died in the mill pond, she died in the mill pond,
She died in the mill pond standin' on her head.

The goslins are cryin', the goslins are cryin',
The goslins are cryin' because their mommy's dead.

Hot Cross Buns is an old English street vendor's song.

Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns!
One a penny, two a penny, Hot cross buns!
If you have no daughters, give them to your sons.
One a penny, two a penny, Hot cross buns!

Jingle Bells was written in 1857 by J.S. Pierpont.

Dashing through the snow,
On a one horse open sleigh,
O'er the fields we go,
Laughing all the way,
Bells on bobtail ring,
Making spirits bright,
What fun it is to ride and sing
A sleighing song tonight.

Chorus:

Oh, Jingle bells, jingle bells,
Jingle all the way.
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh. Hey!
Jingle bells, jingle bells,
Jingle all the way.
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh.

A day or two ago,
I thought I'd take a ride,
And soon Miss Fannie Bright,
Was seated by my side.
The horse was lean and lank,
Misfortune seemed his lot
He got into a drifted bank,
And we, we got upsot.

Now the ground is white,
Go it while you're young,
Take the girls tonight,
And sing this sleighing song,
Just get a bob-tailed nag,
Two-forty for his speed,
Then hitch him to an open sleigh,
And crack! You'll take the lead.

La Volta, by William Byrd, is from the "Fitzwilliam Virginal Book of 1625," a most important source for 16th-century English music. This tune was written for a virginal (a smaller version of the harpsichord) but is well adapted for many other instruments such as guitar, flute, recorder, or violin. This song was very popular during William Shakespeare's time. A little percussion in the form of a triangle, hand drum, or tambourine is a nice addition to this sprightly tune.

Lightly Row is an old English tune.

Lightly row, lightly row,
O'er the shining waves we go!
Smoothly glide, smoothly glide,
On the changing tide.

Let the winds and waters be,
Still and calm and clear to see.
Drift and float, drift and float
In our little boat.

Long, Long Ago was originally titled The Long Ago and was written by Thomas Haynes Bayly, an English songwriter-dramatist, in 1833. After Rufus Griswold replaced Edgar Allen Poe as editor of a Philadelphia magazine, Bayly's collection of poems was printed and the new title was used. This song became immensely popular in America in 1843 and was featured in the 1942 movie "Calling Wild Bill Elliot."

Tell me the tales that to me were so dear,
Long, long ago, long, long ago.
Sing me the songs I delighted to hear
Long, long ago, long ago.
Now you are come, all my grief is removed
Let me forget that so long you have roved
Let me believe that you love as you loved,
Long, long ago, long ago.

Do you remember the path where we met?
Long, long ago, long, long ago.
Ah, yes, you told me you ne'er would forget,
Long, long ago, long ago.
Then to all others, my smile you preferred
Love when you spoke gave a charm to each word
Still my heart treasures the praises I heard,
Long, long ago, long ago.

Though by your kindness my fond hopes were raised.
Long, long ago, long, long ago.
You, by your kindness my fond hopes were raised,
Long, long ago, long, long ago.
You, by more eloquent lips have been praised,
Long, long ago, long, long ago.
But by long absence your truth has been tried
Still to your accents I listen with pride
Blest as I was when I sat by your side,
Long, long ago, long, long ago.

Ode to Joy is from Ludwig van Beethoven's (1770-1827) Hymn to Joy, the finale to the Ninth Symphony. He wrote this choral finale to go with Friedrich von Schiller's hymn, An Die Freude (circa 1816). The Ninth Symphony was first performed on May 7, 1824, but Ludwig van Beethoven, being completely deaf by then, never heard it. The Hymn to Joy was adapted by Edward Hodges (1796-1867) and is found in many church hymnals.

Henry van Dyke (1852-1933) wrote the words that are normally associated with this tune, which is found as number 376 in the Episcopal hymnal, The Hymnal 1982. Tertius van Dyke relates that his father, Henry, placed a manuscript before U.S. President James Garfield in 1881 and said, "Here is a hymn for you. Your mountains (the Berkshires) were my inspiration. It must be sung to the music of Beethoven's Hymn to Joy."

Joyful, joyful, we adore thee, God of glory, Lord of love;
Hearts unfold like flowers before Thee, Praising Thee, their sun above.
Melt the clouds of sin and sadness; Drive the dark of doubt away;
Giver of immortal gladness, fill us with the light of day.

All thy works with joy surround thee, earth and heaven reflect thy rays.
Stars and angels sing around thee, center of unbroken praise.
Field and forest, vale and mountain, blooming meadow, flashing sea,
Chanting bird and flowing fountain, call us to rejoice in Thee.

Thou are giving and forgiving, ever blessing, ever blest,
Wellspring of the joy of living, ocean-depth of happy rest!
Thou our Father, Christ our Brother: all who live in love are Thine;
Teach us how to love each other, lift us to the joy divine.

Oh, How Lovely is the Evening is a traditional English round.

Oh, how lovely is the evening, is the evening.
When the bells are sweetly ringing, sweetly ringing.
Ding, dong, ding; ding, dong, ding.

Oh, When the Saints Go Marching In was probably developed sometime during the latter half of the 19th century by African-American folk singers. It would begin quietly but build up after each stanza until it was "a frenzy of excitement," as Theodore Raph stated. It became a traditional post-funeral parade march in New Orleans and, later, one of the most recognized Jazz songs in America. It was later Louis Armstrong's signature piece.

Oh, when the saints go marching in.
Oh, when the saints go marching in.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
Oh, when the saints go marching in.

Oh, when they come on Judgment Day,
Oh, when they come on Judgment Day,
Lord, I want to be in that number,
Oh, when they come on Judgment Day,

When Gabriel blows that golden horn.
When Gabriel blows that golden horn.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
When Gabriel blows that golden horn.

When they go through them Pearly Gates.
When they go through them Pearly Gates.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
When they go through them Pearly Gates.

Oh, when they ring them silver bells.
Oh, when they ring them silver bells.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
Oh, when they ring them silver bells.

And when the angels gather' round.
And when the angels gather' round.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
Oh, when the angels gather' round.

Oh, into Heaven when they go.
Oh, into Heaven when they go.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
Oh, into Heaven when they go.

And when they're singing hallelu.
And when they're singing hallelu.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
Oh, when they're singing hallelu.

And when the Lord is shakin' hands.
And when the Lord is shakin' hands.
Lord, I want to be in that number,
Oh, when the Lord is shakin' hands.

Pop! Goes the Weasel is a dance tune that was used in England. As a dance tune, it had no other lyrics other than the title, which was used as the catch line of the dance. A couple would shout out the words as they went under the arms of other dancers. The tune was used for a country dance called The Haymakers and published in "Gow's Repository" sometime between 1799 and 1820. After the song lyrics appeared, other words emerged. A March 1860, issue of the Southern Literary Messenger (Richmond, Virginia) published these words about the Queen of England:

Queen Victoria's very sick,
Prince Albert's got the measles.
The children have the whooping cough,
An pop! Goes the weasel.

Here are other versions:

Half a pound of tuppeny rice,
Half a pound of treacle.
That's the way the money goes,
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Up and down the city road, (or the London Road)
In and out the Eagle,
That's the way the money goes,
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Every night when I go out
The monkeys on the table.
Take a stick and knock it off,
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Rigadoon is by Henry Purcell (1659-1695). It is also a description for a lively dance for couples (or the music for the dance) that has two or four beats per measure.

St. Anthony's Chorale was based on a hymn sung by pilgrims on Saint Anthony's Day. Originally attributed to Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), authorities now believe that St. Anthony's Chorale was actually written by Haydn's favorite student, Ignatz Pleyel, who founded the Pleyel Piano Company in 1807. Johannes Brahms was presented a stack of Haydn's manuscripts by Karl Ferdinand Pohl, a Haydn scholar and biographer, in the Fall of 1870. Brahms was interested in the theme of "Divertimento mid dem Chorale St. Antoni" and wrote it in his notebook, but did not produce his two sets of variations based on this theme, Opus 56a and Opus 56b, for three years. These variations have made this theme very popular.

The hymn associated with St. Anthony's Chorale is We, Thy People, Praise Thee, written by Kate Stearns Page (1873-1963). It is usually sung at Thanksgiving. Hymn #6 in the 1966 Methodist hymnal, "The Book of Hymns," is a "unison praise hymn tune" arranged by Edith Lovell Thomas.

We, thy people, praise thee, praise thee, God of every nation!
We, thy people, praise thee, praise thee, Lord of hosts eternal!
Days of wonder, days of beauty, Days of rapture, filled with light;
Tell thy goodness, tell my mercies, tell thy glorious might.

We, thy people, praise thee, praise thee, God of every nation!
We, thy people, praise thee, praise thee, Lord of hosts eternal!
For thy blessings, for thy bounty, Joyful songs to thee we sing,
Songs of glory, songs of triumph to our God and King.

Shepherd's Hey is an English Country Dance tune.

The Banks of the Ohio is a traditional ballad that originated in Ohio. Its story of love and murder has inspired several popular mystery tales as well as several folk ballads.

I asked my love to take a walk,
To take a walk, just a little walk,
Down beside where the waters flow,
Down by the banks of Ohio.

Then only say that you'll be nine,
And in no other arms entwine,
Down beside where the waters flow,
Down by the banks of the Ohio.

Said I to her, "Will you be nine?"
Said she to me, "I must decline,
My mother says, too young am I,
To love one many till the day I die."

I held a knife against her breast,
And gently in my arms she pressed,
Crying, "Willie, don't you murder me,
I'm unprepared for eternity."

I took her by her lily-white hand,
And placed her gently on the sand,
And when the tide was wide and deep,
I pitched her in to rest in sleep.

I started back twist twelve and one,
I cried, "My god, what have I done?
I've murdered the only woman I love,
Because she would not be my bride."

Had she but said she will be mine,
All would be well, all would be fine,
And now she's there, way down below,
Down by the banks of the Ohio.

The Streets of Laredo is an Anglo-American ballad. It is also called The Cowboy's Lament and is based on the old British ballad The Unfortunate Rake," which was also the ancestor of The Saint James Infirmary Blues, an American folk ballad telling a similar tale.

As I walked out in the streets of Laredo,
As I walked out in Laredo one day.
I spied a young cowboy wrapped up in white linen,
All wrapped in white linen as cold as the clay.

"I see by your outfit that you are a cowboy"
These words he did say as I boldly stepped by,
"Come sit down beside me and hear my sad story;
I was shot in the breast and I know I must die."

"It was once in the saddle I used to go dashing,
It was once in the saddle I used to go gay;
First to the dram-house and then to the card-house;
Got shot in the breast; I am dying today."

"Get six jolly cowboys to carry my coffin;
Get six pretty maidens to carry my pall;
Put bunches of roses all over my coffin,
Roses to deaden the clods as they fall."

"Oh beat the drum slowly and play the fife lowly
Play the dead march as you carry me along;
Take me to the green valley and lay the sod o'er me.
For I'm a young cowboy and I know I've done wrong."

"Go gather around you a crowd of young cowboys
And tell them the story of this, my sad fate,
Tell one and the other before they go further
To stop their wild roving before it's too late."

Go fetch me a cup, a cup of cold water,
To cool my parched lips," the cowboy then said;
Before I returned, the spirit had left him
And gone to its Maker -- the cowboy was dead.

Fun Fact: The 1942 hit song Don't Sit Under the Apple is very similar to a "swing" version of Long, Long Ago.

Would you like to return to the previous page or go to the next product description?

The above info is copyrighted by Historical Folk Toys, LLC and has been properly registered with the U.S. Copyright Office.
All rights reserved. Any reprint or reuse -- in any form or by any means -- is strictly prohibited without our written permission.
.

Five-Note Melodies Book in D
Five-Note Melodies Book in D
Item Number 95301

Return to Previous Page

.
Would you like to return to the previous page or go to the next product description?
.

Go to the Next Product Description

Site Navigation Legend

.
Product Catalog
Early Education ~ Classic Toys & Puzzles ~ Traditional Games ~ Home Crafts
Historical Doll Kits ~ Folk Instruments ~ Native American ~ Historical Books
Music Books ~ Index of Catalog Listings ~ Alphabetical & Numerical Listings
Products by Periods Guide ~ Origins of Our Products

General Information
New Products ~ Our Best Sellers ~ About the Elves ~ Our Scrapbook
Affiliations ~ Wholesale Terms ~ Catalog Request ~ Green Policies
.

Go to Top of Page
Go to Site Map

.

Go to the Home Page of Historical Folk Toys Wholesale Only
Read about the Elves at Historical Folk Toys
Address Symbol
10100 Park Cedar Drive, Suite 134 City and State Symbol Charlotte, NC 28210 USA
Phone Symbol
(800) 871-1984 Fax Symbol (800) 871-1899 E-mail Symbol info at historicalfolktoys.com
Call (704) 543-0204 or fax to (704) 543-0205 if dialing locally or from outside the USA.
Home Page Symbol Home Page Privacy Policy Symbol Privacy Policy Wholesale Conditions Symbol Contact Information Legal Notices Symbol Legal Notices Site Map Symbol Site Map
Web Site Content: Copyright © 2004-present by Historical Folk Toys, LLC et al. Web
Site Design: Copyright © 1996-present by Beeline Publications. All rights reserved.
See Our Best Sellers

Unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. No part of this Web site may be published, stored or transmitted -- in any form or by any means
-- without written permission from Julie at Historical Folk Toys, LLC. Copyright violation may result in costly fines for you or your
organization. Getting permission is easy. Getting out of legal trouble is not! Please take a few minutes to read about copyrights &
how they apply to you and the material you find on the Internet: U.S. Copyright Office and "10 Copyright Myths Explained."